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CERTIFICATE

Vermont:  Access to OBCs and Non-ID

VERMONT

DENIES UNRESTRICTED ACCESS TO OBC (Court order required)

 

Who May Access Information
Citation: Ann. Stat. Tit. 15A, §§ 6-104; 6-105

Non-identifying information is available to:
• The adoptive parent or legal guardian of an adopted person
• The adopted person who is age 18 or older or has been emancipated
• A deceased adopted person’s direct descendant who is age 18 or older, or a parent or guardian of a descendant
who is under age 18
• The adopted person’s birth parent, grandparent, or sibling


Identifying information may be disclosed to:
• An adopted person who is age 18 or older or has been emancipated
• A deceased adopted person’s direct descendant who is age 18 or older or the parent or guardian of a direct descendant who
is younger than age 18
• The birth parent
• A birth sibling who is age 18 or older

 

Access to Original Birth Certificate

Citation: Ann. Stat. Tit. 15A, § 6-107

The original birth certificate may be released upon request to an adopted person who is age 18 or older and who has access to identifying information from the State adoption registry.  The original birth certificate is unsealed and becomes public record 99 years after the date of the adopted person’s birth.

Access to Non-identifying Information
Citation: Ann. Stat. Tit. 15A, §§ 6-104; 2-105

Any person listed above may request a detailed summary of any relevant report about the adopted person, the birth parents, and
the adopted person’s genetic history, including the information required by § 2-105 of this title. This report shall exclude identifying
information concerning an individual who has not signed a waiver of confidentiality. The report shall include all of the following
nonidentifying information that is reasonably available:
• A social and health history of the child
• Any physical, sexual, or emotional abuse known to have been experienced by the child
• Enrollment and performance in school, results of educational testing, and any special educational needs
• An account of the child’s past and existing relationships with any relative, foster parent, or other persons
• A social and health history of the minor’s parents and extended family, including:
» Health and genetic history, including any known hereditary condition or disease
» Racial, ethnic, and religious background and general physical description
» Educational, vocational, athletic, artistic, or scientific achievement or interests
» The existence of any other child of the parents

 

Mutual Access to Identifying Information
Citation: Ann. Stat. Tit. 15A, §§ 6-105; 6-106

For adoptions finalized prior to July 1, 1986, the registry shall disclose identifying information if the birth parent has filed any kind of
document that clearly indicates that he or she consents to such disclosure.
For adoptions finalized on or after July 1, 1986, the registry shall disclose identifying information without requiring the consent of the
birth parent unless the birth parent has filed a request for nondisclosure in accordance with the provisions of § 6-106 of this title and  has not withdrawn the request.

Information about the adopted person shall be disclosed to the birth parent if the adoptive parent of the adopted person
who is younger than age 18 consents to the disclosure. Identifying information about a deceased adopted person shall be disclosed
to the birth parent or sibling upon request if the deceased adopted person’s direct descendant is age 18 or older and consents to
the disclosure, or the parent or guardian of a direct descendant who is younger than age 18 consents to the disclosure. Identifying
information about a birth sibling shall be disclosed to the adopted person upon request if both the sibling and the adopted person
are age 18 or older and the sibling consents to disclosure.
A birth parent may prevent disclosure of identifying information by filing a request for nondisclosure with the registry. A request for
nondisclosure may be withdrawn by a birth parent at any time.


Where the Information Can Be Located
Vermont Adoption Registry, Department for Children and Families

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